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Brand stand: the wears and the wear-nots

  • Author:naky
  • Source:www.diecastingpartsupplier.com
  • Release on :2015-06-25
Fashion show finales follow a familiar rhythm: after the models march along the catwalk for a last hurrah, the designer comes out to take a bow. Their demeanour is often telling, an indicator of their attitude to the collection they’ve shown — are they a bag of nerves, or grinning from ear to ear?
Also noteworthy is the look they choose to take their bow in. Are they even wearing their own work? One of the most celebrated designers of our time never wears his own designs. Karl Lagerfeld may create the occasional menswear look at Chanel and he designs a whole men’s collection for his eponymous label but he has long been a customer elsewhere: Dior Homme.
Lagerfeld started wearing Dior Homme when he was in his late sixties, shedding six-and-a-half stone to fit into the skinny styles of the label’s then designer Hedi Slimane. Lagerfeld has stayed loyal to the brand ever since, even after Slimane, now creative director of Saint Laurent, quit in 2006. And although the label is known for its emphasis on youth, Lagerfeld, now in his eighties, remains one of Dior Homme’s most visible clients.
Raf Simons, meanwhile, Dior’s creative director of womenswear, is partial to Prada: his presence in the documentary film Dior & I (2014) is most clearly announced via his distinctive studded Prada sneakers and he often takes his catwalk bow in a head-to-toe Prada look. For his first Christian Dior ready-to-wear show he wore a vintage denim jacket with red stripes by Austrian designer Helmut Lang.
And yet many designers do wear their own work, especially if the brand carries their surname. Editors scan the wardrobe of Miuccia Prada for clues to her latest collection: is she feeling utilitarian, elegant or purposefully off-kilter? When Donatella Versace takes her bow, she often wears a look from the collection she’s just shown — for AW15, it was a pinstriped, flared pantsuit. And even Simons has worn pieces from his own-label collaboration with Sterling Ruby
So if the name is on the label, does it mean the clothes will always be on the designer’s back? Not necessarily. “I’ve never been into wearing clothing with my own brand name inside,” says Jonathan Anderson, designer behind JW Anderson and now creative director of Loewe. “I find it odd and arrogant.”
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